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Baking with fruit? Here’s how to get it right every time

Those who’ve ever looked at a gorgeous pie, crumble, pudding or cake recipe involving fruit and thought, ‘yep, I could make that,’ only to wind up with a disappointingly watery result (better known as the #bakingfail), are not alone. Baking with fruit involves a range of variables – and many a home cook has aimed for picture-perfect baked fruit creations only to have a sloppy, slippery and sad-looking mess fall onto their plates.

And yet, good news awaits! Baking with fruit needn’t be difficult, messy or disappointing – instead, it can be warming, crispy, delicious and beautiful to behold. Feast your fruit-loving eyes on these tips for getting it right, every time:

1. Problem: soggy, watery pies and crumbles …

Solution: although your usual shopping instincts would be to pick the juiciest and ripest fruit on the grocer’s shelves, consider opting for fruit that’s just a little bit underripe, and less likely to emit a lot of juice. If you’re baking with fruit that’s been frozen, ensure you defrost and drain off excess liquid before beginning your bake. Often, adding too much sugar can also lead to a excess liquid – by following a recipe and using less juicy pieces of fruit, you should be on the right track!

2. Problem: fruit sinking to the bottom of muffins and cakes …

Solution: toss the fruit you’re baking in a little flour to coat. Then, when the baked fruit releases any liquid, the flour will absorb the moisture and your fruit won’t slide to the bottom of your muffin or cake. Nobody likes a soggy bottom.

3. Problem: your baked fruit isn’t holding its shape …

Solution: depending on the kinds of fruit you’re baking, you might like to try a different cooking method, such as poaching. For example, if your rhubarb is looking a little dry, it might be better to poach and mash it to top your desserts, rather than serve as a stalk. If you’re cooking with pears, make sure they’re a nice firm variety that haven’t been left to soften on the supermarket shelves for too long.

Get baking with fruit this week with these sweet recipes …

 

 

 

 

This feature contains a mix of content from myfoodbook third party content partners and our own opinions.

 

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