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How to clean burnt stainless steel pots and pans

Okay, we must admit we have certainly pushed our stainless steel pots and pans to the limit. These trusty kitchen items have been through a lot. They have made it through many daily meals, they’ve cooked for the extended family and yes we must admit, they have been exposed to the odd kitchen fail.

It happens to the best of us. You have a few things on the stove, perhaps a few things in the oven and that sauce that you believed was simmering away – starts to produce that dreaded burnt smell.

By the time you get to the pan, there is a burnt film that has firmly planted itself on the base of your favourite stainless steel cookware.

Burnt stainless steel cookware can be saved with this simple and easy method using baking soda

 

So, rather than having to part ways with your trusty, heavy duty pots and pans, here’s a simple cleaning technique that can be achieved with basic items you probably already have in your kitchen.

How to clean burnt stainless steel pots and pans

What you will need

  • Baking soda
  • Scourer or dishwashing brush
  • Boiling water
  1. Fill your burnt cookware with water until is 3/4 full.
  2. Transfer your cookware to the stock top and heat until water boils
  3. Remove from the heat, then let sit for 10-15 minutes. Remove most of the water leaving a small amount in the bottom of the cookware
  4. Add baking soda to the pan to make a paste like substance. Let the mixture sit for a further 5 minutes. Using your scourer, give the pan a deep clean and voilà your burnt stainless steel is like new again.

Take your burnt stainless steel cookware and make it new again with this simple idea using baking soda

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